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Portland builders support natural methods

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Tuesday, May 15, 2012

Several Portland builders are working with the city to bring natural construction into the mainstream.

Bernhard Masterson and others believe that Portland became a leader in progressive building codes in 2008, when the Bureau of Development Services established the Alternative Technology Advisory Committee.

Last week, Masterson and a group of other natural builders brought an application to ATAC requesting feedback on a load-bearing wall system made out of cob, which is a mixture of natural materials including earth, clay and sand.

Even though people have been building cob structures for centuries, and dozens of illicit cob structures have been built throughout the Pacific Northwest, according to Masterson, codifying the use of natural materials is not easy. That’s where ATAC comes in.

Read more at the Daily Journal of Commerce.

{biztweet}natural building{/biztweet}

 

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