Nike unveils Twitter program for shoe releases

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Friday, April 20, 2012
Nike has introduced a new system called Twitter RSVP to manage product launches, ending the practice of standing in line for new releases.

The new procedure, as described on Nike's website, says that by following a particular Nike store's Twitter announcement, and following a series of steps, a consumer can reserve a pair of shoes. 
The new process would appear to allow the company to retain a key feature of some shoe releases: limited supply.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

{biztweet}nike twitter{/biztweet}

 

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