Starbucks drops bugs

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Friday, April 20, 2012
Starbucks is replacing the cochineal beetle coloring of its Strawberry Frappuccinos with tomato-based extract in response to a recent public relations uproar.

Starbucks made the original switch away from artificial coloring in January, when it aggressively moved away from the use of any artificial ingredients in its food and drinks. Starbucks has worked diligently to improve the quality of its menu. But the backlash came just a few months later, when a vegan Starbucks barista alerted a vegan blogger of the change.
At least one consultant thinks Starbucks acted quickly and decisively. "That's pretty quick when it come to companies making major changes in ingredients," says management strategist Barbara Brooks. "They were aggressive and didn't set up a commission with recommendations eight months later."

Read more at USA Today.

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