Airport fees reduced to draw business

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Thursday, April 19, 2012
Medford airport landing fees have been reduced to make the airport more competitive to attract new business.

"It's a great incentive for airlines to stay here and create new lines for ones coming in," said Commissioner C.W. Smith at the meeting. "It's important that we stay competitive."
Landing fees are charged to all commercial and business-registered aircraft not based in Medford, regardless of weight. All other aircraft that weigh more than 12,500 pounds and are not based at the airport are also charged landing fees.

Read more at The Mail Tribune.

{biztweet}medford airport{/biztweet}

 

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