Multnomah County jails go green

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Thursday, April 19, 2012
The Sustainable Jail Project has made a big shift in the past couple years to ease the Multnomah County jails' environmental impact.

Inmates now sip from reusable cups instead of throwaways, and play basketball in recyclable sandals. Those on kitchen duty scrape bits of leftover food into compost bins.
The new attitude at the jail is as much about dollars and cents as it is a sudden change of heart in environmental consciousness. The first round of sustainability initiatives is saving Multnomah County's jail system $400,000 a year, with more cost-saving measures on the way.

Read more at The Portland Tribune.

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