Home Must Reads Fewer women earn high-tech degrees

Fewer women earn high-tech degrees

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Must Reads
Friday, April 13, 2012
Fewer women are earning degrees in high-tech fields, even though employers are having trouble finding candidates to fill those positions.

A new report from the Institute for Women’s Policy Research found fewer women nationwide are getting degrees in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math, known collectively as STEM.
“Women do make significantly more in these fields,” said Cynthia Costello, author of a report on increasing STEM opportunities for women.
Women in STEM careers’ median earnings range from about $41,000 for engineering technicians to $71,900 for electrical engineers, while women overall had median annual earnings of $35,600 in 2009.

Read more at The Bend Bulletin.

{biztweet}women high-tech{/biztweet}

 

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