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Oregon scientists discuss global warming

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Wednesday, April 11, 2012

At an event at PSU, three Oregon climate scientists made their case that increases in manmade greenhouse gases are driving climate change.

The three panelists -- Christina Hulbe of Portland State and Phil Mote and Andreas Schmittner of Oregon State University -- focused on the science behind predictions of increased global warming, pointing to drops in the extent of Arctic sea ice since 1979, worldwide shrinking of glaciers, increased temperatures in the 20th century and increased water vapor consistent with rising temperatures. 
Sun cycles, cosmic ray activity, increased urbanization and natural variability, including the El Niño-La Niña cycle, can't explain the measured temperature increases, they said. 
The vast majority of published climate scientists and scientific bodies support the theory that rising greenhouse gases will drive significant temperature increases, though they acknowledge uncertainties about important climate variables, such as cloud formation.

 

Read more at OregonLive.com.

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