Sponsored by Energy Trust

Hiring slows, but jobless rate falls

| Print |  Email
Must Reads
Friday, April 06, 2012

Hiring slowed in March due to uncertainty about the economy's growth, but the unemployment rate dipped as more Americans stopped looking for work.

The Labor Department says the economy added 120,000 jobs in March, down from more than 200,000 in each of the previous three months.
The unemployment rate fell to 8.2 percent, the lowest since January 2009. But the rate dropped because fewer people searched for jobs. The official unemployment tally only includes those seeking work.
Slower job growth could threaten a recent rise in consumer confidence and dent investors' enthusiasm for stocks. It also could prove a setback for President Barack Obama's re-election hopes.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

{biztweet}unemployment{/biztweet}

 

Comments   

 
Martha  Perez
0 #1 It is strange...butMartha Perez 2012-04-06 11:50:55
I can only speak for myself, when I say that I see opportunities everywhere I go. I am fortunate, to have been empowered to achieve a college degree, work experience, and on-the-job training. Not everyone has been able to do this, and we need to play 'catch up' with that important & troubling matter! However, when one works in activism like I do, on a daily basis, there are chances to make a difference all of the time. In fact, my so-called "problem", is trying to figure out which jobs to pursue, and which ones not to! I had to cultivate this positive 'can-do' attitude, in order to protect me from being too narrow, in my job search, lest I close myself to the possibilities, both big & small. Over the years, I volunteered to help with special projects, that were not officially part of my regular job duties, but I gained so many worthy skills, by doing so! I am not rich, by any means, as I continue to seek the answers to my questions, AND I do work for a company, that I actually enjoy immensely. I finally see the value in looking at our new desert landscape reality, in terms of the fact that there are valuable acorns being overlooked, by far too many in our society, especially some of those who are at present, unemployed. For me, salary is not the only factor I take into account, when considering a position. It has to be about more than just money, while at the same time, acknowledging my worth to an employer. Thanks!
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Diane
0 #2 Not so strange...Diane 2012-04-09 07:36:16
How nice for you that you have so many job opportunities that you can't even pursue them all. How nice for you that you are in a position that you salary is not the only factor that you need to take into account. Most of the unemployed at this point would be willing to take ANY salary, including hourly minimum wage. But it was nice of you to share your good fortune with those of us still struggling to avoid homelessness.
One of the women interviewed has a four-year degree, one of them has a two-year degree and vast experience, so I don't think those "troubling and important matters" are the problem.
It's great that you have been so fortunate. But I wouldn't be so quick to point the "lower your standards" finger at those who haven't had the same luck that you have had. This is not a "bootstraps" problem. This is a lack of jobs problem. Hiring is still slowing, and the job rate is only falling because they don't count people who are not currently collecting unemployment benefits. For some of us, right now, it sure IS all about money. Hard to pay the rent without it.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
wally
0 #3 How nice for you, Martha Perezwally 2012-04-09 07:50:22
Nice of you to drop in and let those of us less fortunate know how well you are doing.
By the way, having a degree is not all that helpful in getting a job these days.
And if you have a degree, you won't be hired for the "acorns" that pay less. Not everyone can afford to "take into account" things other than salary. How arrogant of you. MOst of us will take any minimum wage job we can find, whether or not we have a college degree.
Your only point seems to be that you are glad that you have a job.
Yay you.
Quote | Report to administrator
 

More Articles

Healthcare Perspective

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY KIM MOORE

A conversation with Majd El-Azma, president and CEO of LifeWise Health Plan of Oregon, followed by the Healthcare Powerlist.


Read more...

Healthcare pullback

News
Thursday, November 20, 2014
112014-boehnercare-thumbBY JASON NORRIS | OB CONTRIBUTOR

Each month for Oregon Business, we assess factors that are shaping current capital market activity—and what they mean to investors. Here we take a look at two major developments regarding possible rollbacks of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).


Read more...

Reimagining education to solve Oregon's student debt and underemployment problems

News
Thursday, November 13, 2014
carsonstudentdept-thumbBY RYAN CARSON | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

How do we skill up our future technology workforce in a smart way to take advantage of these high-paying jobs? The answer shouldn’t focus only on helping people get a bachelor’s degree.


Read more...

Behind the curtain: What students should know about accreditation and rankings

Contributed Blogs
Thursday, December 04, 2014
120414-edurating-thumbBY DEBRA RINGOLD | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

How important are institutional and/or program evaluations provided by third parties in selecting a college or university program?


Read more...

Corner Office: Marv LaPorte

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

The president of LaPorte & Associates lets us in on his day-to-day life.


Read more...

Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


Read more...

Corner Office: Pam Edstrom

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

Seven tidbits of information from an agency partner and co-founder of Waggener Edstrom in Lake Oswego.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS