Wet spring delaying crops

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Monday, April 02, 2012

Soggy fields are holding Oregon growers back from early spring plantings.

Tom Silberstein, who specializes in field crops for Oregon State University Extension Service’s Marion County branch, said planting of spring grains, including wheat, is delayed for many Mid-Valley growers.
If rains diminish in April, growers should still be OK to plant. But the longer growers wait, the lower yields they will get in the summer.
“We’re in that transition window,” Silberstein said.

Read more at The Statesman Journal.

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