Whole Foods stops selling unsustainable seafood

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Friday, March 30, 2012

Whole Foods Market said it will stop selling fish caught from depleted waters or through ecologically damaging methods.

Starting Earth Day, April 22, the natural and organic supermarket chain will no longer carry wild-caught seafood that is "red-rated," a color code that indicates it is either overfished or caught in a way that harms other species. The ratings are determined by the Blue Ocean Institute, an advocacy group, and the Monterey Bay Aquarium in California.
Among the seafood disappearing from Whole Foods shelves will be octopus, gray sole, skate, Atlantic halibut and Atlantic cod caught by trawls, which can destroy habitats. The company will stock sustainable replacements like cod caught on lines and halibut from the Pacific.

Read more at KGW.

{biztweet}whole foods seafood{/biztweet}

 

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