Geothermal energy plant planned at Klamath wildlife refuge

Geothermal energy plant planned at Klamath wildlife refuge

A geothermal power plant planned in the Klamath Basin National Wildlife Refuge will be the first to use the new technology.

The plant, which will be developed by Klamath Falls-based Entiv Organic Energy, will use technology developed through a partnership between French energy giant Technip and geothermal specialists Mannvit of Iceland.
The basic systems is known as the Kalina Cycle. The plant pulls hot water out of the ground and uses it to heat another liquid, a mixture of water and ammonia that carries a lower boiling point, which in turn creates the steam to power a turbine and generate power.
The closed-loop system can make use of water heated to between 180 degrees and 300 degrees Fahrenheit — geothermal resources previously deemed too chilly to generate power.

Read more at Sustainable Business Oregon.

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