Fred Meyer will no longer carry "pink slime" beef

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Friday, March 23, 2012

Portland-based Fred Meyer joins the list of grocers that will no longer carry beef containing "pink slime."

After a reversal from its parent, The Kroger Co. of Cincinnati, the Portland-based grocer announced Thursday it would no longer sell ground beef containing the filler that's been under scrutiny since its existence became a hot topic on various social media sites over the past month. 
"Finely textured beef," also known as pink slime, passes federal food standards but became less than appealing for many consumers once they learned how it was made. Manufacturers create the filler by heating and spinning trimmings from steaks and roasts to remove the fat. The remaining meat is then treated with ammonia gas and combined with fattier meat to create leaner hamburger. 
Wal-Mart Stores Inc. also annnounced Thursday that it would begin stocking beef without the filler as soon as possible. Safeway, Albertsons' parent Supervalu Inc. and a number of other national grocers made similar announcements Wednesday, while Target Corp., Whole Foods and Costco Wholesale said they've never sold products with pink slime. Portland-based grocer New Seasons Market said it grinds its own beef and does not use finely textured beef.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

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