Corvallis HP site shouldn't feel immediate effects of restructuring

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Thursday, March 22, 2012

In light of Hewlett-Packard's restructuring, the company's Corvallis site shouldn't feel any immediate effects, according to site manager Sam Angelos.

“It will not have an effect on Corvallis. It’s business as usual,” Angelos said Wednesday. “Right now we’re just doing technology development for new products.”
HP’s 140-acre Corvallis campus has been closely tied to imaging and printing almost from the beginning. The company’s wildly successful inkjet printing technology was developed there in 1984, and the site grew rapidly throughout the late 1980s and early 1990s.

Read more at The Corvallis Gazette-Times.

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