Rural counties struggling without timber payments

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Monday, March 19, 2012

Rural Oregon counties have received their last federal timber payments.

The economic times are already tough in places like Columbia County, where the courthouse is only open four days a week.
“That's with the timber payments,” said Columbia Co. Commissioner Tony Hyde. “Without the timber payments the dire budget we've created is not something I want to face.”
If the payments stop, many county governments could quickly get overwhelmed.

Read more at KGW.

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