Portland biogas plant threatened by lawsuit

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Thursday, March 08, 2012

A  proposed biogas plant in Portland is threatened by a lawsuit slamming Portland water and sewer spending.

 

The $55 million plant proposed by Columbia Biogas in Northeast Portland is intended to convert commercial food waste to electricity and compost. It has been endorsed by the Cully Neighborhood Association and numerous business groups. Mayor Sam Adams hailed the proposal during last week’s State of the City speech.
“Waste, like commercial food scraps and grease, will be diverted from our landfills and sewer systems to the plant and turned into power — enough to fuel the equivalent of 3,000 Portland homes,” Adams said. “Fingers crossed for luck that we can land this $55 million clean energy business headquarters.”
Columbia Biogas Chief Executive Officer John McKinney says private financing has been lined up for the plant’s construction, which can begin in May. But he wants the city to guarantee the financing with a pledge of garbage fees and sewer funds.

Read more at The Portland Tribune.

{biztweet}biogas portland{/biztweet}

 

 

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