Mayor Sam Adams proposes energy plant

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Friday, March 02, 2012

Portland Mayor Sam Adams is proposing using money from sewer and garbage to pay for a $55 million plant to turn food waste into electricity.

The plan, taking shape behind closed doors but outlined in a memo obtained by The Oregonian, calls for Columbia Biogas, a private company, to build the plant in Northeast Portland's Cully neighborhood.
Under one version of the plan, the city would backstop a private loan to the company, offering what's called credit enhancement that could require the city to kick in as much as $900,000 a year for up to 20 years.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

{biztweet}portland energy{/biztweet}

 

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