Home Must Reads New Seasons overhauls "Home Grown" labeling

New Seasons overhauls "Home Grown" labeling

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Must Reads
Friday, March 02, 2012

New Seasons announced an overhaul of its "Home Grown" labeling program that highlights locally produced products.

New Seasons commissioned Sharon McBurney, an Oregon artist, to create original watercolor images to pair with the "Home Grown" label.
New Seasons, which counts more than 10,000 local items in its stores, announced the new look as part of the grocery chain's 12th anniversary celebration.

Read more at Sustainable Business Oregon.

{biztweet}new seasons{/biztweet}

 

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