Home Must Reads Naturally Advanced hires flax adviser

Naturally Advanced hires flax adviser

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Must Reads
Tuesday, February 21, 2012

Naturally Advanced Technologies hired a Salem-based crop adviser to contract with Willamette Valley flax farmers.

Naturally Advanced, which has its executives based in Portland, is working with Ralph Fisher and with Oregon State University to evaluate different strains of flax and identify the type that will give the greatest yields in the region.
Naturally Advanced announced in December it would source flax from the Willamette Valley and potentially locate a processing facility in Oregon to supplement its current fiber processing operation in South Carolina.

Read more at Sustainable Business Oregon.

{biztweet}naturally advanced flax{/biztweet}

 

 

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