EnerG2 opens Albany plant

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Thursday, February 16, 2012

Energy storage company EnerG2 opened a new manufacturing facility in Albany, the world's first plant dedicated to commercial-scale production of engineered carbon.

EnerG2 officials say the synthetic carbon will improve the performance of ultracapacitors and batteries, and replaces carbon otherwise mined from agricultural waste like coconuts, which is ill-suited to energy applications.
“As the rapid advancement of semiconductors enabled the revolution of the high-tech industry, continued applications of our carbon technology platform enable the energy storage revolution,” said CEO Rick Luebbe.
The company employs 43 workers, 35 of them in Albany, and will continue to hire as production at the facility increases.

Read more at Sustainable Business Oregon.

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