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Oregon union members sue state

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Thursday, February 16, 2012

Five Oregon state workers filed a federal class-action lawsuit over a new employee wellness program.

The lawsuit targets the Health Engagement Model, which requires that adults enrolled in the health plan for state employees complete an online health risk assessment survey conducted by their insurance provider.
Those who don’t participate in the HEM are charged a monthly penalty of $20 if they are single or $35 if they are covered as a couple.
The lawsuit alleges that the program coerces state workers into providing personal medical information, in violation of state and federal law.

Read more at The Statesman Journal.

{biztweet}oregon health lawsuit{/biztweet}

 

 

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