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Damascus nursery files for bankruptcy

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Must Reads
Thursday, February 16, 2012

Damascus-based Leo Gentry Wholesale Nursery filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection.

The corporation, which first registered with the State of Oregon in 1978, owes between $10 million and $50 million to between 200 and 999 creditors, according to state records. 
The 20 largest unsecured claims — debts for which there is no collateral — total more than $25 million. Among them are Salem-based Northwest Farm Credit Services ($23.8 million owed, $9.7 million  secured) and Sunrise Water Authority ($175,000 owed).

Read more at OregonLive.com.

{biztweet}damascus nursery{/biztweet}

 

 

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