Kodak to stop making digital cameras

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Thursday, February 09, 2012

Eastman Kodak, the inventor of the digital camera in 1975, is getting out of the business.

The bankrupt printing and imaging company announced Thursday that as part of its efforts to focus on profitable lines of business, it plans to get out of the digital camera, pocket video camera and digital picture frame business by July.
While Kodak itself may no longer offer these products, Kodak-brand cameras may continue on the market, as Rochester-based Kodak said it would explore licensing its name to another company offering such gear.

Read more at USA Today.

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