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Lawmakers prepare for budget cuts

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Monday, February 06, 2012

The extent of state budget cuts will become apparent this week when economists tell the Legislature how much tax money they think Oregon will collect.

The last two quarterly revenue forecasts have delivered disappointing news, forcing legislative leaders to recommend layoffs of state workers, the closure of a prison and smaller paychecks for workers who provide in-home care to seniors and people with disabilities.
Nobody’s expecting to see an influx of money when the projections are released Tuesday, and a sharp decline would force legislators back to the negotiating table in search of more service cuts to close a budget gap that’s already expected to be at least $200 million.

Read more at The Bend Bulletin.

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Comments   

 
Martha  Perez
0 #1 Budget cuts - lots to think about...Martha Perez 2012-02-06 12:12:27
I am working full-time for minimum wage (but I do love my job!) while my income still qualifies me to receive a partial Section 8 housing voucher, limited food stamps, and assistance with heating/telepho ne costs. However, I recently was placed on a waiting list to receive the Oregon Health Plan, and I currently am in desperate need of medical & dental care (I have type two diabetes, and need medicine to control my blood sugar).

The good news, is that I expect to receive a refund, when I complete my income taxes. I learned that my income actually doubled in 2011, despite the economic crisis. I am feeling more hopeful, as we move forward in 2012. I was told that I should be getting some child support payments. In addition, I have been looking at the job market, and it looks like there are more openings this year for workers with my skill level (I speak Spanish, and have a background in government).

My daughter continues to work hard, and got her tax refund, so the money couldn't come at a better time. She receives medical insurance thru her employer, and things are going fairly well at the moment. She hopes to be promoted to a higher paying position with more responsibility. My boyfriend is going to school on a part-time basis, receives partial SSI, food stamps, and a housing subsidy.

My daughter, boyfriend, and I, all depend on public transportation, walking, and bicycling, to get to work, school, shopping, medical care, and other community gatherings. Please consider the consequences on our neighbors, as a result of the decisions being made, with regards to budget cuts, etc. Thanks.
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