Oregon agrees to not charge Facebook extra taxes

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Friday, February 03, 2012

Gov. John Kitzhaber reached an agreement with Facebook officials to not give the company's Prineville data center a special assessment that could cost hundreds of millions of dollars.

 

On Thursday, Facebook officials met with Gov. John Kitzhaber. The governor signaled he would sign legislation that honored a company's original enterprise zone agreement, said Scott Nelson, the governor's jobs and economy policy adviser.
"Over the course of several months, all of the parties got down to work, and it appears that we have the right combination of things to have a positive outcome here," Nelson said.
The Oregon Department of Revenue also is expected to issue a declaratory ruling that confirms Facebook doesn't fall within the definition of a communication company the state is required to assess.
Lawmakers are considering legislation that would exempt companies that own or lease a data center in enterprise zones from having their value assessed by the Department of Revenue.

Read more at The Statesman Journal.

{biztweet}facebook oregon{/biztweet}

 

 

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