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Komen revises funding decision

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Friday, February 03, 2012

After severe backlash, the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure Foundation  announced it would revise a new policy that barred the organization from funding Planned Parenthood.

“We will continue to fund existing grants, including those of Planned Parenthood, and preserve their eligibility to apply for future grants, while maintaining the ability of our affiliates to make funding decisions that meet the needs of their communities,” the statement continues.
The statement left some ambiguity, however, because it did not mention a second reason Komen has given for ending Planned Parenthood’s funding: That the group did not provide direct mammogram services, but instead referred patients out to other locations.
On Thursday, Komen President Elizabeth Thompson told reporters that the funding decision was unrelated to the Congressional investigation into whether Planned Parenthood was illegally using federal funds to pay for abortions.

Read more at The Washington Post.

{biztweet}komen planned parenthood{/biztweet}

 

Comments   

 
Aly S.
0 #1 funny what is left outAly S. 2012-02-03 11:33:43
Why haven't any of the news reports talked about the established link between abortions and breast cancer? Very curious.
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