OSU researches bamboo

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Tuesday, January 31, 2012

Oregon State University students are working with Portland-based Bamboo Revolution to research the sustainable material.

 

“A builder on the leading edge will want to adopt new materials and technology, but doesn’t have the resources or ability to test them him- or herself,” said Sean Penrith, executive director of Earth Advantage Institute. “The academic world and construction industry may be worlds apart, but it’s a symbiotic relationship that should happen more often.”
OSU students Skyler Mlasko and Danny Way are working with assistant professor Arijit Sinha to discern whether bamboo has more structural applications than typically considered in the U.S. market. OSU’s Student Sustainability Initiative, a student-managed grant program, is providing $3,000 for the effort.

Read more at the Daily Journal of Commerce.

{biztweet}osu bamboo{/biztweet}

 

 

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