Latino business owners face unique challenges

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Friday, January 27, 2012

Beaverton's Latino population has increased 40% in the last decade, bringing a surge of new business owners.

Those owners face unique challenges, say experts in business counseling. Latino business owners often don't know how to ask for help because of language and cultural barriers, said Malcolm Boswell, one of two Spanish-speaking analysts for WorkSource Oregon, a statewide organization that connects workers and businesses with job resources. 
Recent immigrants may have limited English language skills and be unfamiliar with complex paperwork such as loans or taxes. Some distrust government and withdraw from public resources for fear that their immigration status may be threatened, Boswell said.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

{biztweet}latino business owner{/biztweet}

 

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Martha  Perez
0 #1 Latino based businessesMartha Perez 2012-01-27 19:31:53
I enjoy patronizing Latino and/both other diverse stores, because they sell items that I can not usually find at mainstream stores like Safeway. I hope that the Asian market concept being proposed for Old Town/Chinatown, shall be realized in the near future, or when the economy improves (sooner rather than later).
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