Oregon's waves have potential

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Friday, January 20, 2012

Waves and tidal currents off Oregon's coast could generate over 60 terawatt hours of electricity each year, according to reports by the U.S. Department of Energy.

 

“Oregon’s wave and tidal current resources offer real opportunities to generate renewable energy using water power technologies in the future,” said Energy Secretary Steven Chu. “Together with new advances and innovations in water power technologies, these resource assessments can help to further develop the country’s significant ocean energy resources, create new industries and new jobs in America, and secure U.S. leadership in an emerging global market.”
These new wave and tidal resource assessments, combined with ongoing analyses of the technologies and other resource assessments, show that water power, including conventional hydropower and wave, tidal, and other water power resources, can potentially provide 15 percent of our nation’s electricity by 2030. The reports represent the most rigorous analysis undertaken to date to accurately define the magnitude and location of America’s ocean energy resources.

 

Read more at KTVZ.

{biztweet}wave energy{/biztweet}

 

Comments   

 
Spanky
0 #1 WAVES and ENVIRONMENTALIS TSSpanky 2012-01-21 09:35:38
This would be a great way to get electricity BUT,
some freak environmental group will find a way to stop it. Probably tell us it is going to hurt the plankton or the starfish in the sea..Can't have dams. Hurts the Salmon. Can't have Wind power. Hurts the birds and bees. Can't have coal. Hurts the air. BUT they all use electricity.
Go figure.......
Quote | Report to administrator
 

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