Wind farm asks for permission to harm eagles

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Thursday, January 19, 2012

West Butte Wind Power is the first wind farm in the country to ask the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service if it can harm Golden Eagles.

It’s a development that follows a three-year-old effort by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to rein in a spike in eagle mortality rates amid collisions with wind turbines, and has conservation groups cautiously optimistic about the wind industry’s future on American lands.
The central Oregon wind farm, owned by California-based Pacific Wind Power, is located 32 miles east of Bend on a 5,000-foot plateau. The 104-megawatt operation set to develop there would include 52 wind turbines on the land off Highway 20. If approved for the “take” permit, West Butte will become the first American wind farm approved under new federal rules intended to reconcile bird protections with a national push for clean energy development.
The rules now tie permit approval for wind farms with conservation measures, allowing wind developers to apply for take permits, or permits allowing wind farms to kill, harass or disturb bald and golden eagles, their nests or their eggs, in exchange for conservation measures that benefit eagles.

Read more at Sustainable Business Oregon.

{biztweet}wind power eagle{/biztweet}

 

 

Comments   

 
John
0 #1 baloneyJohn 2012-01-19 12:01:03
Another example of big brother making the rules as they go, to push something on the public that it might not want. Look at all the "sustainable energy companies" that are going under, AT THE TAXPAYERS EXPENSE! Solindra, just recently we were told that taxpayers are going to have to foot a $20 million expense for failed "green projects" here in Oregon. Wake up people.. Let's get Big Brother out of the picture and let good ole American ingenuity and capitalism regain a foothold in this great country!
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Lisa
0 #2 Eagles vs Spotted OwlsLisa 2012-01-19 12:13:12
What an amazing display of hypocrisy on the part of the greenie weenies! Logging operations ceased because of perceived threats to Spotted Owl habitat (although the Banded Owls didn't get the memo) but because wind energy is "green" (and there are serious doubts about that) it's OK to operate giant Slice N Dicers that can kill eagles! This would be funny if it were not so sickening.

Another case of feelings vs facts. After all once they carve up an eagle or two, they will set out cut twigs for nesting.
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