Small houses catch on

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Tuesday, January 17, 2012

Salem-based Ideabox is forming a micro neighborhood of five tiny homes in Eugene.

The five green, prefab houses have a maximum of 600 or 750 square feet of living space. They are designed to look and feel bigger while retaining the economic and environmental benefits of building, heating and cooling a small space.
Those qualities are in demand, said Greg Johnson, founder of the Small House Society, which is based in Iowa City and has about 5,000 participants nationally.
“People are dialing down their investment in homes and increasing investment in education or personal development.” he said.

Read more at The Register Guard.

{biztweet}ideabox{/biztweet}

 

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