More than 8,000 in PERS retire

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Wednesday, December 21, 2011

More than 8,000 Oregon public employees retired in 2011, 44% higher than the average in recent years.

Preliminary estimates by Oregon Public Employees Retirement System find that 8,279 state workers, city, and county employees, teachers and other public employees filed for retirement in 2011, PERS agency spokesman David Crosley said.
That compares with the annual average of 5,729 workers who retired between 2007 and 2010 and amounts to the most public retirements since 2003, when PERS reform efforts prompted more than 12,500 public employees to retire.
Part of the increase in retirements can be chalked up to simple demographics, Crosley said. Baby Boomers are hitting retirement age, and more will be leaving public service every year.

Read more at StatesmanJournal.com.

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Comments   

 
Jen
0 #1 A future retirement stateJen 2011-12-21 12:44:14
With as many Oregon government employees retiring at the same or greater income than in their working years and at the cost of tax payers, the sacrifice of safety net services, senior services, children services and more - I hope that these wealthy retirees at least stick around to pump our hard earned dollars back into the Oregon economy. However, they probably won't want to live somewhere where police, fire and senior and children services are devastated by lack of funding.
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Martha Perez
0 #2 PERS RetireesMartha Perez 2011-12-21 20:16:30
My concern is for the employees who have to pick up the slack, and/both assume positions of leadership, when those retirees are no longer in the workforce. Do not assume that these posts get replaced, or automatically filled; hence, the work still needs to be done, but with fewer workers, it falls on the shoulders of those remaining. As the economy hopefully improves (albeit painfully slowly) we should see those positions be re-stored, lest we witness a further erosion of availability of many vital government services, that define & interpret our quality-of-life .
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Doug
0 #3 Doug 2012-01-03 09:54:44
I find it interesting that ill informed individuals are so quick to judge someone, and automatically assume all public employees get something for nothing, and will be wealthy retirees. My wife is a public employee who continues to work at 60% of the average salary rate she would if she worked in the private sector doing the same job, has a portion of her salary deducted to pay for our family health plan (just like private sector), a health plan with deductibles/cop ays just like everyone else. With recent cuts, she is doing the work of three people still at the 60% rate (good deal for us tax payers). As a non certified employee, her retirement plan is not 100% funded by the state, she contributes a percentage of her income into her retirement fund (PERS) and a percentage of her own contribution is matched by her employer (the state) and it is then invested in the market for possible earnings. Correct me if I am wrong, but this how most 401K programs operate in the private sector. So, just keep in mind that not all public employees are living in big white houses "at the cost of tax payers", or are going to be wealthy retirees. Not sure why it is a crime for someone who does a job as a public employee to have the same opportunity at salary and benefits as in the private sector. Don't assume all public employees are rich greedy SOB's. They are just trying to work and provide for their families just like you. They also provide the services you want and demand, and are also tax payers, and do spend their money in your stores, your restaurants and on your services. Think they have it so good, quit your "lousy" private sector job and work for a public entity. Once you do, pray your job doesn't get slashed in the next budget crunch.
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