North Portland Goodwill store on the market

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Friday, August 29, 2014

The 10,720-square-foot building on North Lombard Street is listed for $2.5 million.

It is on the market as a single tenant "net-net-net" property — a commercial investment leased to a business in a contract structure that requires the lessee to pay for net real estate taxes, net building insurance and net common area maintenance.

Founded in 1902, Goodwill is a $4 billion nonprofit that helps people get back into the workplace. It has 165 independently run stores in the United States and Canada and had retail sales of $3.8 billion last year.

Read more at Portland Business Journal

 

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