Portland agency wants to change how sportswear brands market to women

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Monday, August 25, 2014

Guidance Counsel has spent the past year updating approaches to the women's activewear market.

"Everybody has been doing the same thing over and over again – 'rah rah, you go girl' empowerment stuff," said Guidance Counsel's Meredith Chase. "There's nothing deeper there."

Sports-apparel brands have sold shoes and clothes to female customers since their formation, of course. But it has only been in recent years, with the growing popularity of activewear as everyday clothing (goodbye jeans) and the ascension of  yoga brand Lululemon (which really wants to be known for more than yogawear), that the category has exploded.

Profits are up and so are the number of companies seeking to capitalize on the trend. 

Read more at OregonLive.com

 

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