Urban Airship CEO steps down

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Wednesday, July 09, 2014

Amid a sexual assault investigation, Scott Kveton is taking an immediate and extended leave of absence from the company.

Effective immediately the company's new chief financial officer, Mike Temple, will take over as interim CEO.

In the letter to employees, Kveton revealed that has been laying the groundwork to exit the company for several months and said that a search for anew CEO has been underway for "a few weeks."

Read more at Portland Business Journal

 

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