Portland city council to legalize 'Airbnb-style' short-term rentals

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Thursday, July 03, 2014

Short-term rentals in single-family homes will be considered legal as long as the host pays a $180 permit fee, has their home inspected every six years, pays lodging taxes and lives on-site for at least nine months out of the year.

Short-term rentals are the staple of new “sharing economy” companies such as Airbnb and HomeAway, which use the Internet to arrange renters in peoples’ homes for stays of less than 30 days. Technically, it’s still illegal in Portland, though more than 1,500 properties are listed inside the city on Airbnb’s website.

After hearing nearly three hours of testimony on a proposed short-term rental ordinance, the City Council approved a package of final amendments Wednesday, giving final form to a measure expected to be formally adopted at the council’s July 23 meeting. Each amendment passed unanimously, a sign there is consensus now on the final ordinance.

Read more at Portland Tribune

 

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