Pot advocates submit petition signatures

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Friday, June 27, 2014

Marijuana supporters submitted 145,710 signatures to the state elections office.

"It's time to stop treating marijuana as a crime," said Anthony Johnson, the chief petitioner for New Approach Oregon. "We're fighting for every vote."

New Approach Oregon needs 87,213 of those signature to be from registered Oregon voters in order to qualify for the ballot.

Read more at Statesman Journal

 

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Guest
-1 #1 RE: Pot advocates submit petition signaturesGuest 2014-06-27 17:58:30
Agreed, it's time to stop treating Cannabis as a crime! Here, in OB Mag, they brag about wine sales going up & up...hmmm, seems to me that would make more drunk drivers on the road?!
People need to research the true benefits of Cannabis before condemming! It's medicine that can cure (for instance: cancer treatment -without side effects of chemo & radiation). It's a plant for Pete's sake! Check out "Simpson Oil" or "Charlotte's Web"
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Guest
+1 #2 Going to Pot?Guest 2014-06-27 18:29:48
Honestly do we need to encourage more intoxication with a drug that is nearly impossible to standardize, subject to abuse and overdose, particularly the "edibles" form and proven to cause brain damage, particularly in the young? This is a positive development?

I was accosted by a group of youth in Bend last weekend asking if I'd sign the petition...to which I said HELL NO! I was then approached by another young man who said he was asking for signatures for a petition AGAINST pot legalization. When I read it I realized he was trying to trick me into signing. I said "You're lying." He laughed and rode off on his skateboard.

People who do not take this seriously need to ask the people in Colorado about the unintended consequences... overdoses, murders, children accidentally consuming pot brownies and cookies, convenience stores turning into pot shops.

I understand that manufacturers in this state are unable to find enough clean and sober workers for the jobs available. So we want to produce more drug addled slackers?

Pot is not a health food people. It is not harmless. It IS addictive. Don't be fooled that there are thousands in jail for possession. Nonsense. As is this ballot measure.

Oh and I fully expect the wrath of the potheads to come down upon me for speaking the truth. So let the games begin.
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