Portland welcomes Airbnb short-term rentals but not in apartments, condos

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Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Under the proposed ordinance, renting out condos and apartments for less than 30-day periods, or renting out entire homes for short-term vacations, would remain illegal.

The council will take more public testimony on the ordinance on July 2, and vote on a few unresolved issues, and then is expected to pass it on July 16.

Though renting homes and other properties for less than 30 days is illegal right now in Portland, Airbnb reports about 1,500 hosts are doing just that. There also are several smaller competitors active here, including numerous vacation rental firms.

Read more at Portland Tribune

 

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