Seattle raises minimum wage to $15

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Monday, June 02, 2014

The Emerald City now holds the nation's highest minimum wage at $15 per hour.

The council unanimously approved the measure before a packed house.

The plan, which includes a lower training wage aimed at teenagers, will phase in the higher, local minimum over three to seven years, depending on the size of the business and benefits they provide employees. Next April 1, when the plan takes effect, every worker will get at least a $1-an-hour raise.

Read more at USA Today

 

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