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Intel strikes deal with environmental groups

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Must Reads
Friday, May 30, 2014

The chipmaker pledged to assess health risks from atmospheric emissions at its Oregon factories, monitor air quality and report the results publicly.

Intel pledged Thursday to adopt a broad regime of air quality monitoring and public reporting of atmospheric pollutants, settling with environmental groups that had threatened to sue over the company's failure to disclose fluoride emissions at its Washington County computer chip factories.

Read more at OregonLive.com

 

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