Salem may relax rules for food trucks

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Wednesday, May 14, 2014

An ordinance could ease the regulations preventing food trucks and trailers from gathering on private property.

"The rules in Salem pretty much make it impossible for most of us to make a living at it," said Richard Foote, a representative of the Salem Food Truck Association. He has a vested interest in seeing food trucks succeed: his Oregon Crepe Company includes a specialty bakery that supplies breads to food vendors.

But Salem may yet catch-up with the street food craze. Salem City Council recently asked city staff to draft an ordinance that would loosen restrictions on food trucks and trailers.

Read more at Statesman Journal

 

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