Innovative tech companies want cities to allow change

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Monday, May 12, 2014

Tech companies pushing into Portland want the city to change their rules to enable new businesses and technologies.

Cities across the country are wrestling with these and other issues as technological transitions once confined to computer screens and smartphones spill out beyond the digital realm. And sometimes, people in the real world are pushing back.

Opponents to changes in the city’s short-term rental laws have packed into public meetings to voice their objections.

Read more at OregonLive.com

 

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