Fukushima radiation found in Oregon tuna

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Tuesday, April 29, 2014

The radiation levels were a thousand times lower than the U.S. Department of Agriculture limit.

"You can't say there is absolutely zero risk because any radiation is assumed to carry at least some small risk," said the study's lead author, Delvan Neville, a graduate research assistant in OSU's Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics. "But these trace levels are too small to be a realistic concern."

Read more at Statesman Journal

 

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