Local nurseries see higher demand

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Monday, April 21, 2014

Americans spent $50.4 billion last year on lawn and garden projects. In 2018, sales are projected to reach $61.9 billion.

In addition to an improving economy and growing consumer confidence, a February storm bearing snow and ice gave a boost to the local gardening industry this year, according to garden centers.

“So much was damaged, there is going to be a large amount of replacement (buying),” said general manager of Gray's Garden Centers Stuart Leaton, who ranked storm damage above the economy in terms of boosting sales.

Demand is high also for BrazelBerries, Leaton said. These popular dwarf berry plants, a relatively new product developed by Fall Creek Nursery with the home gardener in mind, also suffered storm-related damage, he said.

“And there is very big demand in herbs, lavendar, rosemary, which is weather-related,” Leaton said.

Read more at the Register-Guard

 

 

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