Job vacancies up in small businesses

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Must Reads
Tuesday, April 15, 2014

The Oregon Employment Department reported 32,700 job openings in businesses throughout the state.

That’s an increase of about 10,000 from businesses with fewer than 100 employees. Larger companies with 100 or more stayed at the same level. In the Northwest Oregon/Willamette Valley region there were 6,501 vacancies.

Read more at Statesman Journal

 

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