ODOT oil transport records incomplete

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Must Reads
Wednesday, March 26, 2014

The Oregon Department of Transportation reports do not indicate where trains have moved crude oil in the state.

The lagging disclosure adds to questions about the oversight culture at an agency whose top officials have downplayed the risks of moving highly flammable crude around the state.

For months, ODOT officials resisted saying where oil trains moved in Oregon, even denying that they knew. But they should. State law requires railroad companies to tell the state agency where they’ve hauled dangerous substances, including oil, every year.

Read more at OregonLive.com

 

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