Small businesses can bypass Cover Oregon

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Monday, March 17, 2014

The Obama administration announced that small businesses can qualify for tax credits without going through the health insurance exchange.

The move is good news for small businesses in Oregon since the exchange's function for small businesses is on hold indefinitely. A similar change had already been made for the federal exchange used in most states, but now it applies to troubled state-based exchanges as well.

 Read more at OregonLive.com

 

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