Trade commission to decide if China imports harm U.S. solar industry

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Friday, February 14, 2014

The U.S. International Trade Commission will make a preliminary decision on whether solar products imported from China and Taiwan affected U.S. manufacturers.

“Anyone who claims prices will definitely go up is holding water for the Chinese manufacturers,” said Ben Santarris, a SolarWorld spokesman based in Hillsboro. “We hope to restore true competition. We cannot compete with the Chinese government. We’re open to any solution that gets the central Chinese government out of our marketplace.”

Read more at OregonLive.com

 

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