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'Right to work' up for debate

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Monday, January 27, 2014

The measure allowing public union employees to refuse to pay their dues will appear before the U.S. Supreme Court this month.

The argument at the heart of the case regards the First Amendment, which protects (among other things) the freedom of speech. The plaintiffs in this case, who oppose the compulsory union dues, argued that all bargaining activities done by government are inherently political.

Read more at Statesman Journal

 

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