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Eugene inventor patents prospecting tool

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Must Reads
Monday, January 27, 2014

Mark Peterson, owner of Gold Rush Nugget Bucket Inc., has sold more than 2,200 gold panning kits in 14 months.

The rapid rise in the price of gold during the recession also has amped up interest in prospecting, Peterson said. The metal’s price, which cleared $1,889 an ounce in 2011, remains more than $1,200.

Read more at the Register-Guard

 

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