$95M needed to fix The Portland Building

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Friday, January 03, 2014

The city's administrative headquarters needs a $95 million overhaul to repair major structural problems and water damage.

The new projections are just the latest trouble for the home of the iconic Portlandia statue, a building completed 32 years ago for $25 million and plagued by defects ever since. Rather than addressing seismic concerns years ago, as promised, city leaders backtracked after consultants disagreed about the severity of problems.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

 

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